UCSF Research Portal

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The UCSF Research Portal is a place for researchers to connect, collaborate, and communicate. Whether you're here to find your next professional opportunity or reconnect with old friends, you've come to the right place! Start right here by finding your region, or searching for a friend or connection. 

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Friday, March 13 2015

Thursday, July 31 2014

  • 8:23pm
  • 7:49pm

    The following is a sampling of some of the advances made by UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers that are translating into better outcomes for cancer patients.

    Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD

    UCSF cancer center researchers have:

    • Discovered the existence of cancer-causing oncogenes, which led in 1989 to a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for J. Michael Bishop, MD, and Harold Varmus, MD. The discovery opened new doors for exploring genetic mistakes that cause cancer. The landmark work formed the basis for some of the most important cancer research happening today.
    • Discovered the molecular nature of telomeres – parts of chromosomes that critically affect the life span of cells – and the enzyme telomerase that regulates them. Telomeres and telomerase play a key role in cell aging and in cancer, and telomerase is now a therapeutic target for cancer and other diseases. Groundbreaking work on telomeres and telomerase led to a 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for UCSF scientist Elizabeth Blackburn, PhD.
    • Pioneered an adaptive clinical trial design to accelerate the translation of research into breast cancer care. The new type of study, which involves repeated magnetic resonance imaging and tissue analyses to direct changes throughout the course of the trial, aims to quickly gauge the effectiveness for each individual patient of experimental therapies as additions to standard chemotherapy.
    • Pioneered and proved the effectiveness of a mapping technique that allows for the safe removal of tumors near language pathways in the brain. The technique minimizes brain exposure and reduces the amount of time a patient must be awake during surgery.
    • Spearheaded the development of immunotherapy for prostate cancer, which uses a patient's own immune cells to help fight the disease. UCSF led the clinical testing of a vaccine that improves survival and that was the first immunotherapy to gain Food and Drug Administration approval.
    • Pioneered the use of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intraoperative radiation and a drug...
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Thursday, March 13 2014

  • 11:32am
    Changes to Body
     
    The two most common ways to administer drugs are oral ingestion or intravenous injection. These methods disperse medication systemically, and only a small portion of the dosage actually reaches the part of the body that is in need of therapy.
     
    The two most common ways to administer drugs are oral ingestion or intravenous injection. These methods disperse medication systemically, and only a small portion of the dosage actually reaches the part of the body that is in need of therapy.
     
    Targeted drug delivery aims to get therapeutic medication directly to the site in the body that needs it, without exposure to healthy tissues and the resulting side effects.
     
    Targeted drug delivery aims to get therapeutic medication directly to the site in the body that needs it, without exposure to healthy tissues and the resulting side effects.
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    UC San Francisco researcher Aditi Bhargava [1], an associate professor in the Department of Surgery who has expertise in molecular biology and neuroendocrinology, is working on the development of targeted therapeutics in areas of bowel disease and pain. She has teamed up with others from UCSF, including collaborators Peter Ohara [2], PhD, a neuroanatomist, and Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD, a neurosurgeon, to develop a method for delivering small-molecules to a specific target group of cells for treatment of pain.
     
    UC San Francisco researcher Aditi Bhargava [1], an associate professor in the Department of Surgery who has expertise in molecular biology and neuroendocrinology, is working on the development of targeted therapeutics in areas of bowel disease and pain. She has teamed up with others from UCSF, including collaborators Peter Ohara [2], PhD, a neuroanatomist, and Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD, a neurosurgeon, to develop a method for delivering small-molecules to a specific target group of cells for treatment of pain.
     
    “We came up with a technique that could be used like a Trojan horse, encapsulating and...
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Monday, January 13 2014

Thursday, January 9 2014

  • 1:19pm

    Since its founding almost 150 years ago, the University has accomplished a remarkable record of biomedical achievements. Today, UCSF’s exceptional cadre of investigative teams in biological, clinical, social, behavioral and population sciences continues to discover new solutions for preventing and treating a wide array of diseases.

    Speeding Discovery into Treatments

    In addition to building on established UCSF scientific discoveries and knowledge, research teams are focusing on new investigations in translational medicine with the goal of moving scientific discoveries from the laboratory to the bedside, where they can benefit human health. And the research teams are committed to speeding this pace.

    A researcher at the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), a cooperative effort with UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz and private industry.

    Supporting these efforts is UCSF’s widely recognized spirit of collaboration.  Basic science researchers from a variety of disciplines who are working to unmask the fundamental mechanisms of biology through studies at the molecular and cellular levels, are connecting with clinical researchers to prevent, treat and cure many chronic, disabling diseases.

    Cross-Campus Teams

    Two examples of major institutes created specifically to bring together large, cross-campus and cross-disciplinary teams to tackle scientific and health issues are the UCSF Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), a cooperative effort with UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz and private industry.

    The CTSI is designed to facilitate translational medicine and bring better health to more people more quickly. QB3 was established to link the quantitative sciences – mathematics, physics, chemistry and engineering – with the biosciences to attack complex scientific problems and spawn potent, new technologies.

    Leading Research

    The result is a wide range of programs across the University that are established areas of excellence with leading research initiatives.

  • 12:50pm

    Through expert faculty presentations, a keynote address and interactive panel discussions, this conference will provide conference attendees opportunities to understand the global reality and response to violence against children. Tools for clinicians working with children exposed to violence will also be explored.

    Thank you to the more than 200 physicians, nurses, social workers, and others who attended our 2013 conference. And thank you to our many speakers, who came from as far as South Sudan, to discuss “Violence Against Children: Global Perspectives on Resilience, Response and Health Outcomes.” Conference presentations will be made available here in the coming weeks.

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  • 12:35pm

Recently Published Research